I am not Hazara. I am from Panjshir province, but I really wanted to be with my friends during the demonstration and raise my voice for justice.
There were some people who were leaving the demonstration; there was some propaganda about it and they did not want to stay.

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On Saturday, July 23, several thousand demonstrators had gathered on Deh Mazang Square. The protesters were mainly from the Hazara ethnic minority

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It used to be all the rage in Khost to keep Taliban anthems, fighting videos and other insurgent propaganda on one’s mobile phone.

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As a karate champion and teacher, Mina Asadi, brought honor to her country and relief to her countrymen — until she felt forced to leave Afghanistan. Now she is continuing her mission — using sport to help with emotional trauma — in a migrant camp in Indonesia.

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Tech savvy young people in Jalalabad with no access to Internet are paying enterprising content dealers to load pornography onto their smartphones or other devices. These photos and videos can then be shared, leading to an epidemic of such material in the society.

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As summer weather brings intense heat to some parts of Afghanistan, enterprising merchants have found a great way to help people cool off: They sell snow.

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Bad driving by transport companies has led to the deaths of hundreds of passengers. In fact, road accidents are one of Afghanistan’s leading causes of death, ranking behind war and heart disease, but well ahead of other major killers such as birth trauma, maternal mortality and various cancers.

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Hamoon took the long road. After paying $8,000 to a people smuggler, he went to Pakistan, where he was taken through Iran to Turkey, then across to Greece. From there he could travel more freely, since he was now in the European Union. One smuggler would hand him off to another at the border, as he made his way by truck, train, bus and motorcycle through Macedonia, Serbia, Hungary, Austria, Germany, and Denmark, finally reaching his goal, Sweden, after several months.

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KHOST CITY — Civil society activists, tribal elders, youth, businessmen along with thousands of  common people gathered on Sunday, May 15,to add their voices to the protests surrounding the TUTAP power lines.  They asked the government not to let political leaders take advantage of the situation to create serious problems. The Khost protesters want to […]

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Economic malaise, political intrigue and ethnic tensions are all coming together in what could be an explosive combination. Political leaders drawn mainly from the Hazara ethnic minority are calling for as many as one million people to come together in a protest demonstration in the capital on Monday. Follow our blog updates on the protests […]

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Economic malaise, political intrigue and ethnic tensions are all coming together in what could be an explosive combination. Political leaders drawn mainly from the Hazara ethnic minority are calling for as many as one million people to come together in a protest demonstration in the capital on Monday.

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While the telecom industry and infrastructure in Afghanistan has made great progress in the last decade and half, it is still in its nascent stages, and digital penetration is very low. This means that while a lot of people across provinces have access to smartphones, few outside of the urban centers have access to a stable and consistent Internet connection.

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The management of Radio Bahar in Hesse-Aval district in Kapisa informed Paiwandgāh that their daily services were disrupted on two separate occasions last week on Friday, April 29. “On investigating these disruptions, we found that cables connecting to our broadcast antenna had been cut off on both occasions,” stated Jafar Saeedi, managing editor, at the radio station.

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Thousands of Afghans who have sought refuge in Iran are being sent to Syria to fight for the regime of Bashar al Assad. Human Rights Watch reports that the Iranian government often offers cash incentives and a promise of asylum to those who will take up arms in the long and brutal war.

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We walk down a narrow corridor, arriving at a dim and humid hall. There Is a strange, unpleasant smell that burns my nose and catches in my throat. As we enter the hall, the guide puts a big lock and chain on the door and double-checksto make sure it is fastened. There is a hole in the roof for light, and at the other end of the room there is a door leading to a yard.

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“Nawa district is now under the control of Taliban, people are facing many problems there”, said Zainuddin, a resident of Nawa, speaking in Ghazni city. “There are no schools or hospitals. Sick people are usually taken to Ghazni city, but they often die before getting to the hospital due to the bad roads.”

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When Marzia Qasemi found out she was having twins, she couldn’t have been happier. Already a mother of three, she and her family began preparing for the new arrivals.

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These “Walls of Kindness” are an initiative of young social media activists who want to spread a little cheer in a time where insecurity, corruption, poverty, and exile have driven many people to despair.

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A public library has been built in Baghlan with financial help from the Government of Germany. The two-story building cost 16 million Afghani (approximately $230,000), and opened its doors on November 24, 2015. It is the largest public library in Baghlan.

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Public library in Baghlan province built with financial help of Germany.Photo by: Ajmal Omeri)
Abdul Sattar Barez, governor of Baghlan province thanked the government of Germany duringthe inauguration ceremony for the library and called on people to study books and help the government in shaping country’s future.

“Establishing a public library … will expand the book studying culture in Baghlan province,” said Shakeera Aseel, head of the Culture and Information Directorate of Baghlan province.

Baghlan province, located in Afghanistan’s north, has recently been known for things much different from books and learning. It has been the site of fierce battles with the Taliban over the control of several important districts, in which are located the electric power pylons linking the capital, Kabul, to the power source in Uzbekistan.

The library provides a welcome change from a culture of violence.

A representative of GIZ, the German-government-owned organization that funded the library, told the local government that Germany was committed to helping Baghlan, and would continue their efforts.

GIZ has also contributed to two hostels for Baghlan University, making life much easier for students in the province.

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Residents of Afghanistan’s capital are following military operations in the north with more interest than usual lately: The outcome of the battle will determine how much electricity flows to the nation’s capital during these cold winter days.

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